Cable company customer service rage - FOX13 News, WHBQ FOX 13

Cable company customer service rage

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Find someone, anyone, with cable TV who hasn't had at least one miserable experience dealing with that company's customer service people and you've accomplished something we couldn't.

But in fairness to the cable companies, whose business model at this point resembles that of a cartel, as customers we don't always handle system outages or the explanations for them in the most mature fashion.

Every study and every poll we could find ranked cable and Internet providers last when it comes to customer service.

If some sick part of you enjoys suffering through individual tales of cable company woes, consider customer service expert Shep Hyken your ideal date.

"So, he calls his cable TV company and he says: Hey, all I need to know is what channel is the hockey game on in the St. Louis market? And they said: Sir, we need your name, your address, your account number, your mother's maiden name, your position on global warming," Hyken says.

Comcast apologized to a customer who says he spent 20 minutes (8 of which he recorded) convincing a customer service representative to allow him to cancel his service.

100 million Americans pay for cable TV. For the first time ever, that number declined last year. Netflix, Amazon Prime and other online models likely deserve most of the credit, but hours spent on the phone with the cable company and the rage so many of us evidently feel because of that experience certainly don't encourage subscribers to stick around.

"Imagine what would happen if Apple or Zappos or Nordstrom decided that they wanted to get into the cable business," Hyken says. "Can you imagine? They would own the market."

 

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