Military tests robotic mule - FOX13 News, WHBQ FOX 13

Military tests robotic mule

Posted: Updated:
The Legged Squad Support System, or LS3 The Legged Squad Support System, or LS3
NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

The U.S. Marine Corps. has enlisted the help of a four-legged devil-dog of sorts.

A robotic mule known as the Legged Squad Support System, or LS3, is taking part in military exercises in Hawaii.

LS3 is designed to carry 400 pounds and travel 20 miles without refueling. The robot is operated by a Marine with a sensor strapped to his or her foot.

LS3 follows the Marine using computer vision. The military released video of Lance Corporal Brandon Dieckmann operating the robot as he walked across a field in Oahu.

LS3 was invented by robotics firm Boston Dynamics and has undergone three years of testing by U.S. Marines.

The goal is to reduce the amount of equipment that fighters have to wear in the field, which can top more than 100 pounds.

LS3 seeks to demonstrate that a highly mobile, semi-autonomous legged robot can follow squad members through rugged terrain and interact with troops in a natural way, similar to a trained animal and its handler.

The goal is to develop a robot that will go through the same terrain the squad goes through without hindering the squad’s mission. The robot could also serve as a mobile auxiliary power source to the squad, so troops can recharge batteries for radios and handheld devices while on patrol.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Rocket from Wallops Island seen in NJ

    Rocket from Wallops Island seen in NJ

    Thursday, August 28 2014 7:17 AM EDT2014-08-28 11:17:55 GMT
    NASA is reviewing data from a rocket launch that tested a new sub-payload deployment method for suborbital rockets. NASA says a Black Brant IX suborbital rocket was launched at 5 a.m. Thursday from the agency's Wallops Island Flight Facility on Virginia's Eastern Shore. The new deployment method uses small rocket motors to eject sub-payloads from a rocket's main payload. Thursday's test included releasing vapor traces in space.
    NASA is reviewing data from a rocket launch that tested a new sub-payload deployment method for suborbital rockets. NASA says a Black Brant IX suborbital rocket was launched at 5 a.m. Thursday from the agency's Wallops Island Flight Facility on Virginia's Eastern Shore. The new deployment method uses small rocket motors to eject sub-payloads from a rocket's main payload. Thursday's test included releasing vapor traces in space.
  • Hurricane Cristobal to move toward north Atlantic

    Hurricane Cristobal to move toward north Atlantic

    Thursday, August 28 2014 7:11 AM EDT2014-08-28 11:11:47 GMT
    Hurricane Cristobal is expected to move rapidly toward the north Atlantic, staying away from Bermuda and passing south of Nova Scotia. The hurricane's maximum sustained winds early Thursday are near 75 mph (120 kph) with no significant change in strength forecast over the next two days. The U.S. National Hurricane Center says Cristobal is centered about 285 miles (460 kilometers) northwest of Bermuda and is moving northeast near 29 mph (46 kph).
    Hurricane Cristobal is expected to move rapidly toward the north Atlantic, staying away from Bermuda and passing south of Nova Scotia. The hurricane's maximum sustained winds early Thursday are near 75 mph (120 kph) with no significant change in strength forecast over the next two days. The U.S. National Hurricane Center says Cristobal is centered about 285 miles (460 kilometers) northwest of Bermuda and is moving northeast near 29 mph (46 kph).
  • New stands let US Open fans see stars practice

    New stands let US Open fans see stars practice

    Thursday, August 28 2014 6:55 AM EDT2014-08-28 10:55:01 GMT
    U.S. Open fans can't seem to get enough of practice.  That's right, practice. In a new feature at Flushing Meadows this year, elevated stands loom over five practice courts and allow fans to see stars like Roger Federer and Serena Williams groove their strokes, tinker with strategy and sometimes bicker with coaches.
    U.S. Open fans can't seem to get enough of practice.  That's right, practice. In a new feature at Flushing Meadows this year, elevated stands loom over five practice courts and allow fans to see stars like Roger Federer and Serena Williams groove their strokes, tinker with strategy and sometimes bicker with coaches.
Powered by WorldNow

WHBQ-TV | Fox 13
485 S. Highland St.
Memphis, TN 38111

Main Station: (901) 320-1313
Newsroom: (901) 320-1340

Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | New Terms of Service What's new | Ad Choices