Local company helping new parents get rest with overnight infant - FOX13 News, WHBQ FOX 13

Local company helping new parents get rest with overnight infant care service

Posted: Updated:
WASHINGTON -

Having a baby changes your life in so many ways. There are the new journeys and the new responsibilities. It can be enormously joyous and very stressful. And with a newborn, sleep is a luxury.

There is a company that is helping new parents take the stress out of the mix. They are called Let Mommy Sleep and that is exactly the point.

The sweet innocence and curiosity of a new baby. They are so helpless and vulnerable. When a baby enters your life, it brings great joy, but it can also be an overwhelming challenge.

Ann and Ken Orem are getting used to life with their twins -- Luke and Maura. Born six weeks early, they spent several days in the neonatal intensive care unit before finally going home.

And when that day arrived, like any new parent, Ann and Ken were nervous.

“They had been taken such good care of, it was kind of scary as a new mom and a new dad to think, ‘Wow! Now they're ours,’” said Ann.

Then they discovered Let Mommy Sleep, a team of baby nurses, postpartum caregivers and specialists. They help transitions new parents from hospital to home.

They say by allowing parents sleep at night, they allow families to thrive during the day.

But the concept of a night nurse sometimes draws skepticism and uneasiness, especially here in the United States.

By asking for help some moms feel they are failing and not caring for the child all on their own when millions do every day.

And then there is the worry of having a stranger in your home with your baby.

But the Orems said they couldn't afford not to do it. Her husband had to work, and after a C-section, she had physical limitations.

“It allowed me to heal,” Ann said. “I did have a major surgery and you don't realize how long it takes for your body to heal.”

The Orems’ nurse taught Ann and Ken many things, including sleeping strategies, swaddling and tips for a better breastfeeding experience. And the nurse cared for the babies in the overnight hours allowing Ann to get the sleep she needed.

“You're not missing a moment at 3 [a.m.] just to feed your baby,” said Ann. “You're missing a moment when you're exhausted and you can't emotionally and almost physically be there for your children.”

“I think the perception is very wrong that it's this luxury for people who don't feel like getting up or something,” said Denise Stern, the creator of Let Mommy Sleep. “That's not what it is.”

Stern had a 17-month-old son when she brought her twins home from the hospital. Her own experience inspired her to start a business four years ago -- enabling moms to sleep.

“I was literally lying in bed,” she said. “You know what we should call it? Let Mommy Sleep! Let's get right to the point.”

It is a business that has really caught on in the Washington region with so many young professionals who have demanding jobs but don't have family nearby.

Stern said many people diminish the importance of getting help.

“It was just a very reassuring process,” said Ann. “It allowed me to be myself and to feel good and to wake up every morning and enjoy every moment with my children.”

Because taking care of mommy is just as important as taking care of baby.

Let Mommy Sleep serves the D.C. metro area and employs about 30 nurses. Prices start at $30 an hour and go up depending on your needs.

They also offer consultations over the phone or Skype where you can get a customized care plan.

On their website, www.letmommysleep.com, they also have a blog with valuable info to help new families.

  • Latest health newsMore>>

  • Flesh-eating bacteria found in Chesapeake Bay nearly kills Md. man

    Flesh-eating bacteria found in Chesapeake Bay nearly kills Md. man

    Monday, July 28 2014 11:41 PM EDT2014-07-29 03:41:27 GMT
    A Maryland man nearly lost his leg and his life due to a flesh-eating bacteria called Vibrio vulnificus, which is typically found in brackish waters like the Chesapeake Bay.
    A Maryland man nearly lost his leg and his life due to a flesh-eating bacteria called Vibrio vulnificus, which is typically found in brackish waters like the Chesapeake Bay.
  • Fist bumps less germy than handshakes, study says

    Fist bumps less germy than handshakes, study says

    Monday, July 28 2014 8:27 AM EDT2014-07-28 12:27:32 GMT
    When it comes to preventing the spread of germs, maybe the president is on to something with his fondness for fist bumps. The familiar knocking of knuckles spreads only one-twentieth the amount of bacteria that a handshake does, researchers report. That's better than a high-five, which still passes along less than half the amount as a handshake.
    When it comes to preventing the spread of germs, maybe the president is on to something with his fondness for fist bumps. The familiar knocking of knuckles spreads only one-twentieth the amount of bacteria that a handshake does, researchers report. That's better than a high-five, which still passes along less than half the amount as a handshake.
  • Aid Group: 2 Americans have Ebola in Liberia

    Aid Group: 2 Americans have Ebola in Liberia

    Monday, July 28 2014 7:18 AM EDT2014-07-28 11:18:05 GMT
    Two American aid workers have tested positive for the Ebola virus while working to combat an outbreak of the deadly disease at a hospital in Liberia, a relief group official said.
    Two American aid workers have tested positive for the Ebola virus while working to combat an outbreak of the deadly disease at a hospital in Liberia, a relief group official said.

Powered by WorldNow

WHBQ-TV | Fox 13
485 S. Highland St.
Memphis, TN 38111

Main Station: (901) 320-1313
Newsroom: (901) 320-1340

Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices