7-year-old girl sends letter asking scientists to make her a dra - FOX13 News, WHBQ FOX 13

7-year-old girl sends letter asking scientists to make her a dragon, and they give her one!

Posted: Updated:
(Photo courtesy: CSIRO) (Photo courtesy: CSIRO)
(Photo courtesy: CSIRO) (Photo courtesy: CSIRO)
(Photo courtesy: CSIRO) (Photo courtesy: CSIRO)

A 7-year-old girl made a curious request for the scientists at Australia’s national science agency: she wanted them to make her a dragon. And what did they do? They actually delivered!

Sophie Lester sent a letter to the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) for her special wish. Sophie wrote:

Hello Lovely Scientist

My name is Sophie and I am 7 years old. My dad told me about the scientists at the CSIRO. Would it be possible if you can make a dragon for me. I would like it if you could but if you can’t thats fine.

I would call it toothless if it was a girl and if it is a boy I would name it Stuart.

I would keep it in my special green grass area where there are lots of space. I would feed it raw fish and I would put a collar on it. If it got hurt I would bandage it if it hurt himself. I would play with it every weekend when there is no school.

Love from Sophie

Sophie also included an illustration on what she wanted her dragon to look like.

The agency posted her letter and picture on its website and it has since gone viral.

CSIRO was originally founded in 1926, but never during their existence have they performed any research on dragons.

“Over the past 87 odd years we have not been able to create a dragon or dragon eggs,” scientists at CSIRO wrote on its website. “We have sighted an eastern bearded dragon at one of our telescopes, observed dragonflies and even measured body temperatures of the mallee dragon. But our work has never ventured into dragons of the mythical, fire breathing variety.”

CSIRO expressed regret for this, adding: “And for this Australia, we are sorry.”

But on Friday morning, CSIRO finally came through. Toothless, a 3D printed dragon made out of titanium, was born at 9:32 a.m. (AEDT).

The science agency created the dragon at its additive manufacturing facility in Melbourne and it will be sent to Sophie’s home in Brisbane.

“Being that electron beams were used to 3D print her, we are certainly glad she didn’t come out breathing them … instead of fire,” said Chad Henry, CSIRO's Additive Manufacturing Operations Manager. “Titanium is super strong and lightweight, so Toothless will be a very capable flyer.”

Sophie's mother told the Canberra Times that after the response from CSIRO, Sophie wants to become a scientist and work for the agency.

CSIRO wrote, “We’d love to have you in our team, Sophie. For now, stay curious.”

To see how Toothless was made, watch the video here.

  • Viral StoriesMore>>

  • Drones get more space to roam over Texas: FAA approves runway for unmanned aircrafts

    Drones get more space to roam over Texas: FAA approves runway for unmanned aircrafts

    Monday, September 15 2014 10:06 AM EDT2014-09-15 14:06:39 GMT
    The skies over South Texas are about to get a lot more crowded after drone researchers at a Texas university were granted more airspace to test and fly their unmanned aircraft. The Federal Aviation Administration recently approved a new range for the Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center at Texas AM University-Corpus Christi, providing the researchers with around 290 flying days a year over mountains, high deserts, agriculture, coastal and maritime topographies, including the...
    The skies over South Texas are about to get a lot more crowded after drone researchers at a Texas university were granted more airspace to test and fly their unmanned aircraft. The Federal Aviation Administration recently approved a new range for the Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center at Texas AM University-Corpus Christi, providing the researchers with around 290 flying days a year over mountains, high deserts, agriculture, coastal and maritime topographies, including the...
  • Kids' poisonings linked to anti-addiction medicine

    Kids' poisonings linked to anti-addiction medicine

    Monday, September 15 2014 9:31 AM EDT2014-09-15 13:31:20 GMT
    CHICAGO (AP) -- An anti-addiction drug used to fight the nation's heroin and painkiller abuse epidemics poses a threat to young children who accidentally swallow relatives' prescriptions, a federal study says. Some children have died. The study found that the drug, buprenorphine, was the adult prescription medication most commonly implicated in emergency hospitalizations of children aged 6 and younger. For every 100,000 patients prescribed buprenorphine, 200 young children were hospitalized ...
    CHICAGO (AP) -- An anti-addiction drug used to fight the nation's heroin and painkiller abuse epidemics poses a threat to young children who accidentally swallow relatives' prescriptions, a federal study says. Some children have died. The study found that the drug, buprenorphine, was the adult prescription medication most commonly implicated in emergency hospitalizations of children aged 6 and younger. For every 100,000 patients prescribed buprenorphine, 200 young children were hospitalized ...
  • Ravens fans, men and women, wear Ray Rice jerseys at Thursday night game

    Ravens fans, men and women, wear Ray Rice jerseys at Thursday night game

    Thursday, September 11 2014 11:18 PM EDT2014-09-12 03:18:32 GMT
    Music blared from the purple bus, and Baltimore Ravens fan Racquel Bailey stood with drink in hand amid her usual tailgate buddies while making a bold fashion statement: a black, rhinestone-decorated jersey with the white No. 27. A Ray Rice jersey.
    Music blared from the purple bus, and Baltimore Ravens fan Racquel Bailey stood with drink in hand amid her usual tailgate buddies while making a bold fashion statement: a black, rhinestone-decorated jersey with the white No. 27. A Ray Rice jersey.
Powered by WorldNow

WHBQ-TV | Fox 13
485 S. Highland St.
Memphis, TN 38111

Main Station: (901) 320-1313
Newsroom: (901) 320-1340

Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | New Terms of Service What's new | Ad Choices